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Logan Inman Assignment 6 September 24th, 2013 Advertisements in the asses 1 . ) Berkeley & Gay Furniture uses quite a few different methods to play on consumer’s anxieties and prejudices. They infer that they are a way to look above, “Malicious” or those breaking the prohibition act during that time period. The furniture store plays on parent’s fears for their children and creates a link between keeping their children out of trouble with the law by having a lavishly furnished house.

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This link was not an easy gap to bridge, but they did a good Job reasoning that if a younger person who is cost susceptible to the lure of restricted alcohol is unashamed of his home, he will chose staying home to entertain guests rather than venture out. Parent’s are made to think that if their child has a home that is, “embarrassing,” to them, they will go to places like, “Malicious. ” 2. ) Berkeley & Gay appeals to consumer’s self image and yearning for social acceptance in a lot of ways as well.

They create the illusion that if one has a furnished home by Berkeley & Gay, they will appear more high class and law abiding. The store uses descriptive terms like, “tasteful,” “refined,” and, “rich,” to scribe their merchandise and appeal to the sensory elements of consumer’s minds. Every parent wants their child to, “fit in,” Berkeley & Gay suggests that their furniture will make you and those in your family proud of your home and that everyone will wish to come there for entertainment instead of somewhere such as, “Malicious. 3. ) Eveready creates a need for its product by painting a scene that makes it seem invaluable to own their flashlights. Eveready plays on parent’s emotions and suggests that you’re not a good parent if you don’t educate your children on flashlights and creates a sense of moral obligation to own one in your home. Eveready hints that their product keeps danger and tragedy away. Even their slogan, “A Thousand Things May Happen in the Dark,” creates a sense of urgency to own one of these flashlights to ensure safety.

Eveready use of the term, “life-saver,” adds greatly to this affect. Eveready also integrates scare tactics into their ad, what parent is going to ignore something that involves comments on their parent’s and their child’s health. I thought that little Jane was dead before I read on because of their word choice and I believe that they meant for this assumption to be made to even more greatly impact consumers during their advertisement.

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