Political Change

University of Phoenix Material- “Lemel Johnson” July25, 2011 Economic, Social, and Political Change Worksheet Agricultural Revolution Respond to each of the following questions in two to three sentences: 1. What are the three most important factors contributing to the agricultural revolution in Europe? The potato’s vitamins, minerals, and high carbohydrate content provided a rich source of energy to Europe’s rural poor. It was simple to plant, required little or no cultivation, and did well in damp, cool climates.

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However, in 1845, a fungus from America destroyed the new potato crop. 2. How did the agricultural revolution change European society? Provide an example. The Europeans had to develop new ways of communicating; creating commerce; and consider more liberal idealism • Industrial Revolution Respond to each of the following questions in two to three sentences: 1. What are the three most important factors contributing to the industrial revolution in Europe? A. ) BUILDING NATIONS: THE POLITICS OF UNIFICATION-

The revolutions of 1848 had occurred in a period of experimentation from below. Radicals enlisting popular support had tried and failed to reshape European states for their own nationalist, liberal, and socialist ends B. ) REFORMING EUROPEAN SOCIETY – After the revolutions of 1848, government repression silenced radical movements throughout Europe. But repression could not maintain social harmony and promote growth and prosperity. In the third quarter of the nineteenth century, Europe’s leaders recognized that reforms were needed to build dynamic and competitive states. C. CHANGING VALUES AND THE FORCE OF NEW IDEAS – A WORKING WOMAN: New occupations labeled “women’s work” were essential to the expansion of industrial society. A healthy and literate population guaranteed a strong citizenry, a strong army, and a strong work force. As helpmates, women entered a new work sector identified by the adjective service (Kishlansky, M. , Geary, P. , & O’Brien, P. 2008). 2. Describe working conditions in factories and mines between 1800 and 1850. What was life like for a typical worker? Reference at least one primary source to support your response.

Western Social Change between 1815 and 1914 Write two to three sentences per concept about how each of the following changed in Western society between 1815 and 1914: Romanticism – Unlike liberalism and conservatism, which were fundamentally political ideologies, romanticism included a variety of literary and artistic movements throughout Europethat spanned the period from the late eighteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. The role of women – Woman’s proper role was that of wife and mother in the home, caring for her husband and family, watching over her children.

Young women worked before they married to help their parents and to save for dowries. Science – Science changed the way people thought and the way they lived. It improved the quality of life by defeating diseases, improving nutrition, and lengthening life span. But scientific knowledge was not without its costs. Scientific discoveries led to new forces of destruction. Scientific ideas challenged moral and religious beliefs. Anti-Semitism – A very different type of crisis began to take shape in 1894 ith the controversy surrounding the trial of Captain Alfred Dreyfus (1859–1935) that came to be known simply as “the Affair. ” Dreyfus was an Alsatian Jewish army officer accused of selling military secrets to the Germans. His trial for treason served as a lightning rod for xenophobia—the hatred of foreigners, especially Germans—and anti-Semitism, the hatred of Jews (Kishlansky, M. , Geary, P. , & O’Brien, P. 2008). Western Political Change between 1815 and 1870 Write two to three sentences per concept about how each of the following changed in Western society between 1815 and 1914:

Liberalism – The term liberal was first used in a narrow political sense to indicate the Spanish party of reform that supported the constitution modeled on the French document of 1791. Conservatism – Conservatism represented a dynamic adaptation to a social system in transition. In place of individualism, conservatives stressed the corporate nature of European society; in place of reason and progress, conservatives saw organic growth and tradition. The alliance system – Only by joining forces had the European powers been able to defeat Napoleon, and a system of alliances continued to be needed even after the battles were over.

Two alliance pacts dominated the post-Napoleonic era: the renewed Quadruple Alliance and the Holy Alliance. The Communist Manifesto – The Communist Manifesto is one of the most important documents in world history. Translated into many languages in countless editions, it inspired worker organizations throughout Europe in the second half of the nineteenth century and fired the imagination of Communist leaders in Asia, Latin America, Africa, and Europe well into the twentieth century. . Realpolitik – In an age of realistic politicians, Bismarck emerged as the supreme practitioner of Realpolitik, the ruthless pursuit by any means, including illegal and violent ones, to advance the interests of his country(Kishlansky, M. , Geary, P. , & O’Brien, P. 2008). References Kishlansky, M. , Geary, P. , & O’Brien, P. (2008). Civilization in the West (7th ed. ). New York, NY: Pearson Longman. Civilization in the West (7th ed. ). New York, NY: Pearson Longman.

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