Marine Products Export Development Authority (Mpeda)

Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) Origin of MPEDA The Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA) was constituted in 1972 under the Marine Products Export Development Authority Act 1972 (No. 13 of 1972). The role envisaged for the MPEDA under the statute is comprehensive – covering fisheries of all kinds, increasing exports, specifying standards, processing, marketing, extension and training in various aspects of the industry.

Do you like this text sample?
We can make your essay even better one!


order now

Structure, Activities & Network MPEDA functions under the Ministry of Commerce, Government of India and acts as a coordinating agency with different Central and State Government establishments engaged in fishery production and allied activities. The composition of the Authority is given in Annex I. Standing Committees of MPEDA • Executive Committee • Technical Committee • Export Promotion Committee The plan schemes of the Authority are implemented under seven major heads: 1.

Market Promotion 2. Capture Fisheris 3. Culture Fisheries 4. Processing infrastructure & value addition 5. Quality control 6. Research and development 7. Viability gap funding Work programme of MPEDA 1) Registration of infrastructure facilities for seafood Export trade 2) Collection and dissemination of trade information 3) Projection of Indian marine products in overseas markets by participation in overseas fairs and organising international seafood fairs in India. ) Implementation of development measures vital to the industry like distribution of insulated fish boxes, putting up fish landing platforms, improvement of peeling sheds, modernisation of industry such as upgrading of plate freezers, installation of IQF machinery, generator sets, ice making machineries, quality control laboratory etc. 5) Promotion of aquaculture for production of shrimp and prawn for export. 6) Promotion of value added Seafoods. 7) Promotion of Tuna fishery. 8) Implementation of organic farming. 9) Conservation management. OFFICES OF MPEDA

The Head Quarters of MPEDA is located at Kochi in Kerala. The regional offices of MPEDA in Veraval (Gujarat), Mumbai (Maharashtra), Kochi (Kerala, Chennai (Tamil Nadu), Visakhapatanam (Andhra Pradesh) and Kolkata (West Bengal) and six sub regional offices at Goa, Mangalore (Karnataka), Kollam (Kerala), Tuticorin (Tamil Nadu), Bhubaneswar (Orissa) and Guwahatti (Assam) are functioning as field offices for implementation of various activities of the Authority besides engaging themselves in export promotion of marine products by providing guidance and assistance to the processing industry and the export trade.

Similarly six regional centres in Kochi (Kerala), Panvel (Maharashtra), Valsad (Gujarat), Thanjavur (Tamil Nadu), Vijayawada (Andhra Pradesh), and Bhubaneswar (Orissa) and four sub regional centres in Kannur (Kerala), Karwar (Karnataka), Bhimavaram (Andhra Pradesh) and Kolkota (West Bengal) extend assistance to augment production of shrimp to sustain and increase exports. MPEDA has also set up three stand alone laboratories, other than the one in Head Quarters, at Bhimavaram, Nellore in Andhra Pradesh & Bhubaneswar(Orissa) equipped with sophisticated equipments like LC MS MS for testing various parameters.

The Authority operates two overseas Trade Promotion Offices, one at Tokyo (Japan) and the other at New York (USA) with Resident Directors as Head of Offices. The objectives of the overseas Trade Promotion Offices are to promote seafood imports into the respective countries by liaising with Indian exporters as well as overseas importers, developing contact with Government agencies/officials to remove identified constraints, promote the image of Indian products through publicity campaigns, identify markets for new products, create awareness on the capabilities of Indian processing, packaging, quality inspection procedures etc. nd also to identify suitable joint venture partners for deep sea fishing, aqua culture projects, processing and marketing value added products etc. The adviser Agriculture and Marine Products Division of the Indian Trade Centre, Brussels (under the Ministry of Commerce) assists MPEDA in its trade promotion activities in Europe, and liaises with the European countries. Seafood Exports A Brief History of Marine Products Exports

Till the end of 1960, export of Indian marine products mainly consisted of dried items like dried fish and dried shrimp. Although frozen items were present in the export basket from 1953 onwards in negligible quantities, it was only since 1961 the export of dried marine products was overtaken by export of frozen items leading to a steady progress in export earnings. With the devaluation of Indian currency in 1966 the export of frozen and canned items registered a significant rise.

Frozen items continued to dominate the trade. Markets for Indian products also spread fast to developed countries from the traditional buyers in neighboring countries. Market Structure Before 1960, the markets of Indian marine products were largely confined to neighbouring countries like Sri Lanka, Myanmar (formerly Burma), Singapore etc. when our exports were dominated by dried items. This situation changed with the development of technology/modernization; dried products gave way to canned and frozen items.

The product shift also resulted in market shift. More sophisticated and affluent markets viz. Japan, USA, Europe, Australia, etc. became our important buyers. Several seafood processing units with modern machinery for freezing and production of value added products were set up at all important centers in the country for export processing. For a long time USA was the principal buyer for our frozen shrimp but after 1977, Japan emerged as the principal buyer of the product, followed by the West European countries.

Japan retained its position till 2001-02 as the single largest buyer for our marine products accounting for about 31% in the total export value. During the year 2002-03 and 2003-04 USA emerged as the single largest market for our marine products. During the year 2004-05, the European Union has collectively become the largest importer of Indian marine products and it retained its position since 2005-06. During 2008-09 European Union (EU) continued as the largest market with a percentage share of 32. % in $ realization followed by China 14. 8%, Japan 14. 6%, USA 11. 9%, South East Asia 10%, Middle East 5. 5% and Other Countries 10. 6%. May be due to the prevailing economic recession export to EU, USA and Japan declined 6. 08%, 10. 18% and 8. 80% respectively, all other countries increased their import of marine products from India during the year. Export Trends The export of marine products has steadily grown over the years – from a mere Rs. 3. 92 crore in 1961-62 to Rs. 8607. 94 crore in 2008-09.

Marine products account for approximately 1. 1 % of the total exports from India. GROWTH IN EXPORT OF INDIAN MARINE PRODUCTS (1961- 62 to 2010 – 2011) |Year |Quantity in Tonnes|Value inRs. |Average Unit value |Average Exchange|Value in US $ |Average Unit |Growth rate % | | | |Crore |Realization (Rs. / |Rate US $ |Million |ValueRealization US $ / Kg. | | | | |Kg) | | | | | | | | | | | | |Quantity |Rupee Value |Dollar | | | | | | | | | | |Value | |1 |2 |9 |4 |5 |6 |7 |8 |9 |10 | | | | | | 1961-62 |15732 |3. 92 |2. 49 |NA |NA |NA |-21. 30 |-15. 52 |NA | |1962-63 |11161 |4. 20 |3. 76 |NA |NA |NA |-29. 06 |7. 14 |NA | |1963-64 |19057 |6. 09 |3. 0 |NA |NA |NA |70. 75 |45. 00 |NA | |1964-65 |21122 |7. 14 |3. 38 |NA |NA |NA |10. 84 |17. 24 |NA | |1965-66 |15295 |7. 06 |4. 62 |NA |NA |NA |-27. 59 |-1. 12 |NA | |1966-67 |21116 |17. 37 |8. 23 |NA |NA |NA |38. 06 |146. 3 |NA | |1967-68 |21907 |19. 72 |9. 00 |NA |NA |NA |3. 75 |13. 53 |NA | |1968-69 |26811 |24. 70 |9. 21 |NA |NA |NA |22. 39 |25. 25 |NA | |1969-70 |31695 |33. 46 |10. 56 |NA |NA |NA |18. 22 |35. 47 |NA | |1970-71 |35883 |35. 07 |9. 77 |7. 578 |46. 40 |1. 29 |13. 21 |4. 81 |NA | |1971-72 |35523 |44. 55 |12. 54 |7. 4731 |59. 61 |1. 68 |- 1. 00 |27. 03 |28. 47 | |1972-73 |38903 |59. 72 |15. 35 |7. 6750 |77. 81 |2. 00 |9. 51 |34. 05 |30. 53 | |1973-74 |52279 |89. 51 |17. 12 |7. 7925 |114. 87 |2. 20 |34. 38 |49. 88 |47. 2 | |1974-75 |45099 |68. 41 |15. 17 |7. 9408 |86. 15 |1. 91 |-13. 73 |-23. 57 |-25. 00 | |1975-76 |54463 |124. 53 |22. 87 |8. 6825 |143. 43 |2. 63 |20. 76 |82. 03 |66. 48 | |1976-77 |66750 |189. 12 |28. 33 |8. 9775 |210. 66 |3. 16 |22. 56 |51. 87 |46. 88 | |1977-78 |56967 |180. 12 |31. 62 |8. 5858 |209. 9 |3. 68 |-14. 66 |-4. 76 |-0. 41 | |1978-79 |86894 |234. 62 |27. 00 |8. 2267 |285. 19 |3. 28 |52. 53 |30. 26 |35. 94 | |1979-80 |86401 |248. 82 |28. 80 |8. 0975 |307. 28 |3. 56 |-0. 57 |6. 05 |7. 74 | |1980-81 |75591 |234. 84 |31. 07 |7. 9092 |296. 92 |3. 93 |-12. 51 |-5. 62 |-3. 7 | |1981-82 |70105 |286. 01 |40. 80 |8. 9683 |318. 91 |4. 55 |-7. 26 |21. 79 |7. 41 | |1982-83 |78175 |361. 36 |46. 22 |9. 6660 |373. 85 |4. 78 |11. 51 |26. 35 |17. 23 | |1983-84 |92187 |373. 02 |40. 46 |10. 3400 |360. 75 |3. 91 |17. 92 |3. 23 |-3. 50 | |1984-85 |86187 |384. 29 |44. 59 |11. 886 |323. 24 |3. 75 |-6. 51 |3. 02 |-10. 40 | |1985-86 |83651 |398. 00 |47. 58 |12. 2349 |325. 30 |3. 89 |-2. 94 |3. 57 |0. 64 | |1986-87 |85843 |460. 67 |53. 66 |12. 7782 |360. 51 |4. 20 |2. 62 |15. 75 |10. 82 | |1987-88 |97179 |531. 20 |54. 66 |12. 9658 |409. 69 |4. 22 |13. 21 |15. 31 |13. 4 | |1988-89 |99777 |597. 85 |59. 92 |14. 4817 |412. 83 |4. 14 |2. 67 |12. 55 |0. 77 | |1989-90 |110843 |634. 99 |57. 29 |16. 6492 |381. 39 |3. 44 |11. 09 |6. 21 |-7. 62 | |1990-91 |139419 |893. 37 |64. 08 |17. 9428 |497. 90 |3. 57 |25. 78 |40. 69 |30. 55 | |1991-92 |171820 |1375. 89 |80. 08 |24. 4737 |562. 9 |3. 27 |23. 24 |54. 01 |12. 91 | |1992-93 |209025 |1768. 56 |84. 61 |28. 9628 |610. 63 |2. 92 |21. 65 |28. 54 |8. 62 | |1993-94 |243960 |2503. 62 |102. 62 |31. 3655 |798. 21 |3. 27 |16. 71 |41. 56 |30. 72 | |1994-95 |307337 |3575. 27 |116. 33 |31. 4000 |1138. 62 |3. 70 |25. 98 |42. 80 |42. 5 | |1995-96 |296277 |3501. 11 |118. 17 |31. 5000 |1111. 46 |3. 75 |-3. 60 |-2. 07 |-2. 39 | |1996-97 |378199 |4121. 36 |108. 97 |35. 7500 |1152. 83 |3. 05 |27. 65 |17. 72 |3. 72 | |1997-98 |385818 |4697. 48 |121. 75 |36. 2500 |1295. 86 |3. 36 |2. 01 |13. 98 |12. 41 | |1998-99 |302934 |4626. 87 |152. 74 |41. 000 |1106. 91 |3. 65 |-21. 48 |-1. 50 |-14. 58 | |1999-00 |343031 |5116. 67 |149. 16 |43. 0300 |1189. 09 |3. 47 |13. 24 |10. 59 |7. 42 | |2000-01 | 440473 |6443. 89 |146. 29 |45. 4975 |1416. 32 |3. 22 | 28. 41 |25. 94 |19. 11 | |2001-02 |424470 |5957. 05 |140. 34 |47. 5292 |1253. 35 |2. 95 |-3. 63 |-7. 56 |-11. 1 | |2002-03 |467297 |6881. 31 |147. 26 |48. 2933 |1424. 90 |3. 05 |10. 09 |15. 52 |13. 69 | |2003-04 |412017 |6091. 95 |147. 86 |45. 7091 |1330. 76 |3. 23 |-11. 83 |-11. 47 |-6. 61 | |2004-05 |461329 |6646. 69 |144. 08 |44. 6683 |1478. 48 |3. 20 |11. 97 |9. 11 |11. 10 | |2005-06 |512164 |7245. 30 |141. 46 |44. 655 |1644. 21 |3. 21 |11. 02 |9. 05 |11. 21 | |2006-07 |612641 |8363. 53 |136. 52 |45. 1367 |1852. 93 |3. 02 |19. 62 |15. 43 |12. 69 | |2007-08 |541701 |7620. 92 |140. 68 |40. 1293 |1899. 09 |3. 51 |-11. 58 |-8. 88 |2. 49 | |2008-09 |602835 |8607. 94 |145. 79 |45. 99 |1908. 63 |3. 17 |11. 29 |12. 5 |00. 50 | |2009-10 |678436 |10048. 53 |148. 11 |47. 11 |2132. 84 |3. 14 |12. 54 |16. 74 |11. 75 | INDIA’S SEAFOOD RESOURCE India with a long coast line of 8129 Kms, two million sq. kms of Exclusive Economic Zone and 1. 2 million hectors of brackish water bodies, offers vast potential for development of fisheries. Against an estimated fishery potential of 3. 9 million tones from marine sector, only 2. 6 million tones are tapped. Fishing efforts are largely confined to the inshore waters through artisanal, traditional, mechanised sectors.

About 90% of the present production from the marine sector is from within a depth range of up to 50 to 70 meters and remaining 10% from depths extending up to 200 meters. While 93% of the production is contributed by artisanal, mechanised and motorised sector, the remaining 7% is contributed by deep sea fishing fleets confining their operation mainly to the shrimp grounds in the upper East Coast. Estimated group-wise fishery potential of Indian EEZ and coast-wise marine fishery resource potential are furnished in Annex II and Annex III. Annex IV shows state wise shrimp farming in INDIA. Built up Capacity of the Indian seafood Industry |Name of |No. of |No. of |Freezing |No. of |Storage |No. f | |the State |Exporters |Process |Capacity |Cold |Capacity |Fishing | | | |Plants |(Ton. p/d) |Storages | |Vessels | |Tamil Nadu |286 |48 |524. 55 |67 |5900. 00 |1562 | |Karnataka |43 |14 |186. 40 |26 |3540. 00 |3226 | |Andhra Pradesh |95 |52 |779. 50 |53 |7200. 00 |717 | |Goa |9 |7 |104. 00 |9 |1275. 0 |420 | |Gujarath |64 |55 |2216. 03 |57 |22925. 00 |426 | |Orissa |30 |21 |220. 00 |20 |2460. 00 |414 | |Maharastra |268 |41 |1327. 11 |39 |19372. 00 |2932 | |West Bengal |99 |37 |340. 00 |30 |3500. 00 |0 | |Delhi (UT) |92 |– |0. 00 |1 |15. 00 |0 | Maritime States of India [pic] |Kerala | | |Maharashtra | | | | | |Tamil Nadu | | |Gujarat | | | | | |Pondichery | | |West Bengal | | | | | |Karnataka | | |Orissa | | | | | |Andhra Pradesh | | |Goa | | | | | |Andaman & Nicobar Islands | | |Lakshadweep | | | | Future Prospects Future Prospects for Marine Products Export Industry Marine products have created a sensation in the world market because of their high health attributes. With the high unit value, seafood has been acclaimed as one of the fastest moving commodity in the world market. The world market for seafood has doubled within the last decade reaching US $49. 32 billion mark India’s share is 2. %, dependence on shrimp as a product and is changing due to the increased attention given on other fishery resource like squid, cuttlefish, fin fish, etc. and penetrating into markets of Western Europe and South East Asia. Our export to Japan has increased from US$251. 49 million of 1987-88 to US $ 641. 68 million by 1997-98. In the comparable period export to Europe has increased from US$60. 76 million to $113. 80 million. Steady growth is anticipated during the coming years due to rapid expansion taking place in the production front through shrimp farming and introduction of several resource specific vessels to enlarge the marine fish landings. MARINE CAPTURE FISHERIES

The Fishing Industry in India is contributing significantly to the agricultural export of the country and thereby helping poverty alleviation and generating employment to millions of people in the coastal area. India with a fishery production 6. 57 million metric tons from both captured and cultured resources is ranked 3rd among the largest fishing producing countries and occupies the 17th position among the seafood exporting countries of the world. The estimated potential yield from the Indian EEZ measuring 2. 02 million sq. km. is 3. 93 million Metric Tons of which the current exploitation is only 3. 3 million Metric Tons. While the territorial waters have been almost exploited to the maximum sustainable yield levels or beyond, the contribution from the deep sea is insignificant in terms of export.

The deep sea fishing industry as of today is almost a 100% shrimp oriented one faced with over exploitation of the available shrimp resources. The expert committee who have studied the Indian deep sector has recommended for diversifying the existing deep sea/mechanized fishing fleet to resource specific vessels. Majority of the deep sea fishing vessels and mechanized fishing vessels in operation in Indian waters are trawlers and not equipped for resource specific fishing such as long lining for tuna, jigging for squid etc. India has about 58000 mechanized boats and more than 58 active deep sea fishing vessels are involved in deep sea fishing.

Sustainability of fishing has assumed significant importance in the context of some importing countries insisting on information on the sustainability of the fisheries of the exporting countries. Under the vision for capture fisheries, it is envisaged that India through a sustainable management system will have to exploit its potential to the full in the coming years through a progressive conservation policy, fishing to become total sustainable. Besides India to emerge as a leading exporter of tuna and other under exploited resources like oceanic squid, India to gain prime position in the world sashimi market by focusing on quality and will emerge as a leading exporter of oceanic tuna.

MPEDA has been designated as the nodal agency by the Govt. of India to validate Catch Certificate for the export of marine products to EU countries since 1st January 2010.. Catch certification is an integral part of the EU Regulation No. 1005/2008 which will improve traceability of all fishery products traded with the EU community, facilitates control of their compliance with conservation and management measures. In order to boost the export from capture fisheries, MPEDA is implementing the following schemes. • Subsidy for the conversion of existing fishing vessels to tuna long liners. • Interest subsidy for the construction of new tuna long liners. Assistance to fishermen for better preservation of catch – Subsidy for installation of insulated fish hold/RSW system/ice making machine onboard fishing vessel. • Training in monofilament long line fishing for tuna and better handling of catch for value addition. Export Production through aquaculture Aquaculture To augment production through aquaculture and to sustain and increase the sea foodexports, an Aquaculture wing was established in the year 1979 in MPEDA to promote aquaculture in coastal brackish water areas. Subsequently field offices were opened in different maritime states. At present, there are 6 regional and 4 sub-regional centres spread across the coastal states are extending technical assistance in the field. The activities carried out by these field units include: 1.

Macro and micro level survey to identify suitable sites for farming 2. Preparation of site specific project reports 3. Technical advice on various aspects of farming right from seed stocking to harvesting 4. Training farmers/entrepreneurs in farming 5. Arrange visit of farmers from one state to other for learning different aspects of farming 6. Conduct workshop/seminar/symposium/farmers meets/training programs for the benefit of farmers/entrepreneurs. 7. Providing financial assistance for the new farm development and hatcheries of commercially important species, setting up of PCR laboratories , ETS facilities in farms and hatcheries etc. 8.

Providing technical and financial assistance for development of shrimp and scampi farming in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Orissa states under mission mode program 9. Providing technical and financial assistance for development of Padasekharams in the state of Kerala 10. Promotion of Indian Organic Aquaculture Programme (IOAP) and providing technical and financial assistance under the same for production and export of organic shrimp and scampi 11. Conducting demonstrations in diversified aquaculture for fin and shell fishes in cages and ponds and introduction of new species and technologies 12. Carrying out census and GIS mapping of coastal aqua farms

In addition to the existing field centres for development of Aquaculture, the MPEDA established two sister organizations namely the Rajiv Gandhi Centre for Aquaculture (RGCA) in 1996 at Sirkali in Tamilnadu for developing breeding and farming technologies for various commercially important species and National Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture (NaCSA), as an extension arm at Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh in 2006 for promoting sustainable aquaculture practices through Best Management Practices and by establishing aqua farmers welfare societies The RGCA and NaCSA were set up for supplementing the development and sustainability for production of marine products for export. The RGCA established facilities in Tamilnadu for breeding of Seabass and mudcrabs, Artemia cyst production, while breeding and farming of Cobia is done in Kerala, farming of Seabass and mud crab in Karaikal, broodstock development of scampi in Andhra Pradesh, Specific Pathogen Free Broodstock production facility for P. monodon and Grouper breeding and farming facilty in Andamans.

It also established the Aqautic Quarantine Facility for checking of quality of imported L. vannamei broodstock imported to the country. The activities of NaCSA are detailed and can be viewed under the web site www. nacsa. org Quality Control Quality & Food Safety is the foundation of any food processing industry. In the sea food industry, quality control is a very vital element as quality of the products processed is highly heterogeneous and perishable in nature, particularly under tropical conditions. Realizing this, the industry has adopted modern methods of handling, processing besides adequate quality control measures to improve the quality of sea food.

Over the past few years, safety has become very topical subject eliciting a great deal of public concern particularly in the developed countries, where food safety offences are now regarded at Government level. Selling, offering for sale, possessing and or advertising for sale of food that does not comply with food safety requirements are now offences as per food safety requirements. Enforcement Officers have been given very detailed and powerful new provisions for dealing with the process, premises and equipments that contravene the legislation or pose a threat to the health of the consumer. As technology advance and public awareness grows, consumers are becoming increasingly demanding in terms of the choice, quality, freshness, nutritional value and microbiological safety of food.

Advances in food technology has helped to curtail opportunities for microbiological hazards and significant developments in laboratory diagnosis such as the novel techniques developed viz: Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), High Performance Liquid Chromatograph coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HPLC with MS MS) etc. which facilitates not only the detection of pathogens / residue levels much more quickly but also to a level of minute sensitivity. These developments have contributed to major improvement in ensuring safety of food. To cope up with the increasing demand for safe food and to satisfy the needs of health / quality conscious consumers of the global seafood market, MPEDA has identified the following thrust areas for development / improvement and implement programmes as under: i) Product development for export:

O Research and development of new products O Training in new technology and inviting overseas technical experts to India ii) Quality improvement O Imparting training to technologists of Indian seafood industry on various aspects of quality control. O Entrusting special research projects on quality problems with National Research Institutes as and when required. O Monitoring of seafood quality in landing and pre-processing centers. O Integrated development programme for upgrading seafood quality by providing infrastructural facilities like pre-processing centers and setting up of mini lab towards quality assurance.

O Evolving standards for compliance for export of fish and fishery products to various developed countries based on standards / norms / regulations prescribed by such countries from time to time. Salient features of some of the standards now being implemented in India are given below: The Regulations (EC)EC Directive No. 91/493/EEC dated July 22, 1991 prescribes the health conditions for the production and placement of fish and fishery products on the unified European market and came into force with effect from 1. 1. 1993. This Directive also lays down procedure for fixing conditions for imports from third countries, depending on health situation in those countries.

It stipulates that inspections may be carried out on the spot by experts from the Commission and the Member States to assess the capability of the Competent Authority, to verify the conditions of production, storage and despatch of fish and fishery products to the European Union. While fixing import conditions, the European Commission has taken into consideration the following: • The legislation of the exporting country • The organization of the Competent Authority of the exporting country. • Actual health conditions during production, storage and dispatch • Assurance, which the exporting country can give on compliance with EC standards. • Name of the final authority which issues the health certificate • Organization of the final authority, its infrastructural facilities for inspection, laboratory testing etc.

The authority’s legal basis, which gives its powers and its facilities for effectively verifying the implementation of the legislation in force. Having satisfied with all such requirements, the European Commission has approved imports from the approved establishments in India. Consequent to the promulgation of US Seafood Regulation on HACCP on 18th December 1995, it has become mandatory that every processor and importer has to comply with HACCP with effect from 18. 12. 1997. MPEDA constituted HACCP Cell in early 1996 to assist the Indian seafood industry for the effective implementation of HACCP. The major activities of the HACCP Cell are : • Organizing training programmes in HACCP basic principles, audit etc. or the benefit of technical personnel in the seafood industry and related departments. So far, 32 such programmes were organized for the benefit of over 900 technical personnel. • Assisting the seafood establishments in the preparation of HACCP manual, certification of such manuals, certification of HACCP compliance etc. So far, 26 processing establishments in India are issued with HACCP compliance certificate by MPEDA. • Inviting Consultants from US FDA, NMFS, FAO / INFOFISH etc. from time to time which facilitates in updating knowledge on HACCP and strengthen the technical base of MPEDA and the industry. • Technical personnel of MPEDA are trained in India and abroad on various aspects of HACCP including HACCP Audit.

Besides, MPEDA Lab at Cochin has facilities to test seafood samples for heavy metals, pesticides and antibiotic residues using advanced technology. Apart from maintaining good rapport with regulatory authorities in the importing countries, MPEDA is serving as a member in the Export Inspection Council of India, Bureau of Indian Standards and National Committee of Codex Alimentarius. ORNAMENTAL FISH DIVISION Ornamental Fish Trade Ornamental fish keeping, the second most popular hobby after photography in the developed countries of the world, is gaining popularity in many developing countries also. The growing interest in aquarium fishes has resulted in steady increase in aquarium fish trade globally.

Since 1985, the value of international trade has increased steadily, touching USD 350 million in 2007 and developing nations contributed two third of the total export value (FAO, 2007). The wholesale value of the global ornamental fish trade is estimated to be US$ 1 Billion while the retail value is US$6 Billion. The entire industry, including accessories and fish feed, is estimated to be worth around US $18-20 billion. More than 2,500 species are traded and some 30-35 species of fresh water fish dominate the market. While more than 90 percent of fresh water fish are captive bred, out of nearly 8,000 marine ornamentals, only 25 are bred in captivity. The trade with an annual growth rate of 8 percent offers a lot of scope for development.

About 120 countries import ornamental fish. The major importer is EU, followed by North America and Japan. UK with 19% and Germany with 18% of the trade share are the major markets in EU. France, the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain and Italy are also major importers of ornamental fish. USA is the largest player in North America with over 85% of the import share. Singapore is the largest exporter for many years and exports more than double that of the top five exporters for the last 2-3 decades. Singapore is regarded as a major trade hub in the region. India is endowed with a suitable climate, abundant water resources, rich biodiversity and large manpower base.

However, India’s share in global ornamental fish trade is negligible and at present the ornamental fish export from India is dominated by the wild caught species. More over, the unit value of ornamental fish is higher than the food fish. Hence this sector offers good opportunity for rural and urban households to augment income and link them to the International trade. Almost all of the tank bred ornamental fish in India comes from the small-scale or back yard type of breeding units. But due to the lack of adequate infrastructure and key inputs like appropriate feed, quality brood stock etc these breeding units are not in a position to produce high quality fishes in bulk quantity, which is the major requirement in the international trade. MPEDA’s interventions

To develop India into a leading exporter of ornamental fish, MPEDA envisages setting up of a sustainable production base of 7200 breeding units for producing 500 million fish per annum. The MPEDA‘s developmental initiatives in the sector aims at strengthening our production base to international standards, bridging technology gaps and improving the marketing linkages. Strengthening the infrastructural facilities MPEDA has launched a scheme for strengthening the infrastructural facilities for the mass production of high quality ornamental fish. Employment generation in rural and semi urban areas is a bye product of this scheme. Assistance to set up Ornamental Fish Breeding Units (OFBU) under three categories viz, Grade –I, II, III is provided under the scheme. Bridging the technology gaps

As ornamental fish breeding requires skills in breeding and rearing of many species, training is essential for entrepreneurs who are inducted in the OFD schemes. Moreover the scientific knowledge of the filed also need to be updated promptly as more and more species are added to the trade owing to the development of novel breeding technologies. Hence providing adequate training is imperative for the successful culmination of the developmental initiatives. In line with these objectives, MPEDA organizes basic (introductory training on basic aspects) and advanced training (covering specific topics in detail) programmes for the scheme beneficiaries.

Basic training programme of 5 days duration are organized mainly for beginners and proposed scheme beneficiaries with a view to introduce them to these aspects. MPEDA is also involved in organizing awareness programmes, workshops, Seminars, certification programmes, funding for R projects in the sector as well as facilitating foreign collaborative projects. Develop marketing linkages for the export of ornamental fishes Ornamental Fish Marketing Societies: MPEDA implements a financial assistance scheme for providing financial assistance for establishment of ornamental fish marketing societies (OFMS. OFMS are established by ornamental fish breeders to market their produce.

Participation in national & international fairs/exhibitions In order to showcase the potential and promise of Indian ornamental fish sector at the international level, MPEDA participates in major international exhibitions on ornamental fish organized across the world. VALUE ADDITION The dietary habits of the people all over the Globe are changing fast and India is gearing up to produce and supply value added products in convenience packs by adopting the latest technologies and by tapping the unexploited and under exploited fishery resources. Our vision is to achieve the export of 5 Billion US $ worth marine products by 2014-15that too with the 75% contribution of value added items.

Value addition has been considered as the thrust area. Indian seafood processing units will be encouraged to go in for value addition and export through setting up new units, expanding their capacity and diversifying their current activities etc for value addition during the coming years. Foreign collaboration, investments, tie ups in marketing of value added products and fish import for further processing and export in value added forms will be encouraged. Market Promotion Market Service and Market Promotion Market services and market promotion have assumed special significance in view of the growing stiff competition from other seafood exporting countries in all overseas markets.

Consequent on the large scale development of commercial scale shrimp farming in several shrimp producing countries in Asia and Latin America, the shrimp exporting countries are making all efforts to maximize share in all major world markets. There is need for stepping up of our promotional programmes in major overseas markets and developing better rapport with trade and officials in the importing countries. With this aim and objective, MPEDA has drawn up various market promotion programmes for projecting our resource potential, product diversification, quality assurance and liberal incentives for investments and joint ventures. These include: 1. Overseas market survey 2. Data collection and maintenance of Data Bank 3. Assistance for market development 4.

Publicity through media and production of literature and films on trade promotion. 5. Sponsoring of sales team / delegations. Invitation to overseas experts for export promotion visit to India. 6. Organising buyer-seller meets in overseas markets 7. Participation in overseas Trade Fairs and Exhibition 8. Exhibition & Trade Fairs within India. The MPEDA in association with the trade has been organizing seafood trade fairs every alternate year in India. Over the years, these biennial fairs have achieved a distinct position among international trade fairs. The last fair, the India International Seafood Show – 2010 organized at Chennai was a grand success.

To popularize export oriented aquaculture and culture of ornamental fishes, MPEDA proposes to organize ‘AQUA-AQUARIA INDIA 2011’ at Chennai from 6th to 8th February 2011, which will be a conglomeration of all activities related to both sectors. Technical sessions, Buyer-seller meets etc. are also planned along with this grand show that showcases the interests of all stakeholders of those sectors and beyond. MPEDA also participates actively in major seafood exhibitions abroad. European Seafood Exposition, International Boston Seafood Show, Japan International Seafood & Technology Expo, Fine Food Australia, Dubai Seafood show etc. are few of them.

We also encourage joint participation by the exporters in these shows to promote their brands & products. Brand Building The MPEDA has taken a policy decision to have tie ups with established brands for promoting the Indian Black Tiger. MPEDA and Sysco Corporation Inc. , USA has signed a Co-branding agreement for the promotion of Indian Black Tiger Shrimp in US market on 5th October 2009 at New Delhi. Under this agreement MPEDA Logo will be co-branded with Sysco’s well established PORTICO brand. Once the Indian Black Tiger brand is established, export of other products also would get a major boost because of better brand image of seafood exported from India. MPEDA logo will be awarded to processors who satisfy the standards fixed by MPEDA.

ˆ Back To Top
x

Hi!
I'm Samanta

Would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out