Collective Bargaining

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING COLLECTIVE Group Action BARGAINING Negotiation Introduction: Collective bargaining is the process whereby workers organize collectively and bargain with employers regarding the workplace. In a broad sense, it is the coming together of workers to negotiate their employment. * Collective bargaining is specifically an industrial relations mechanism or tool, and is an aspect of negotiation, applicable to the employment relationship. Collective bargaining is a formal process that involves negotiation, consultation and the exchange of information between employers and workers, the end goal being an agreement that is mutually acceptable to all parties. * It is traditionally a bipartite process (i. e. a process involving two parties). * “Collective Bargaining is a mode of fixing the terms of employment by means of bargaining between an organized body of employees and an employer, or an association of employers usually acting through organized agents.

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The essence of collective bargaining is a bargain between interested parties,andnota decreefrom outside parties”. – Hoxie. * “Collective Bargaining takes place when a number of work-people enter into a negotiation as bargaining unit with an employer or group of employers with the object of reaching an agreement on the conditions of employment ofthework-people”. – Richardson. * The agreements reached through collective bargaining are legally binding and apply to all workers, whether or not they actively participated in the bargaining process. The ILO Right to Organize and Collective Bargaining Convention (No. 98), 1949 describes collective bargaining as: “Voluntary negotiation between employers or employers’ organizations and workers’ organizations, with a view to the regulation of terms and conditions of employment by collective agreements. ” * Collective bargaining could also be defined as negotiations relating to terms of employment and conditions of work between an employer, a group of employers or an employers’ organization on the one hand, and representative workers’ organizations on the other, with a view to reaching agreement. It is a rule making or legislative process in the sense that it formulates terms & conditions under which labour & management may co-operate & work together over a certain stated period. * In collective bargaining, the employer does not deal directly with workers, but he deals with a collective authorized institution (Union representative). * In collective bargaining certain essential conditions need to be satisfied, such as the existence of the freedom of association and a labour law system. It is defined in the Encyclopedia of Social Sciences as “ a process of discussion and negotiation between two parties, one or both of whom is a group of persons acting in concert. The resulting bargain is an understanding as to the terms & conditions under which a continuing service is to be performed. More specifically, collective bargaining is the procedure by which an employer or employers and a group of employees agree upon the conditions of work. History: History of collective bargaining in India can be studied under Three different periods: * From 1920 to 1950 * From 1951 to 1969 * From 1970 onwards

These periods reflect distinct features of collective bargaining in the country. 1920-1950: * Trade unionism made its first appearance at the end of the Ist World War with the establishment of the Madras Labour Union in 1918 * But not until 1920, any serious effort was made to bargain collectively. * Gandhiji advocated the formula for resolving industrial disputes by negotiation and mutual discussion between employers and labour. * In the year 1920, a group of employers and their workmen (in the cotton textile industry at Ahmedabad ) concluded collective bargaining arrangements to regulate labour- management relations. The Bombay Industrial Dispute Act of 1938, created an atmosphere conducive to the growth of collective bargaining in the country. * The establishment of bodies like Indian Labor Conference and The Standing Labour Committee in 1942 created an environment much needed for the success of collective bargaining in the country. * The Bombay Industrial Relations Act 1946, which replaced the 1939 Act, incorporated the provision of settlement of industrial disputes by conciliation officers and the Board of Conciliation. The Industrial Disputes Act 1947, allows the works committee in addition to the other settlement authorities which further paved the way for growth of mutual negotiations in industries. Thus, it can be said that during 1920-1950 , collective bargaining was present on industrial relations scene in India. 1951-1969: * A number of steps were taken by the Government of India, which directly or indirectly had some impact on collective bargaining in the country. In the first 5-year plan (1951-56), it was stated that the workers right of association, organization and collective bargaining was to be accepted without reservation as the fundamental basis of mutually satisfactory relationships. * The Industrial Policy Resolution of 1956 further declared that in a socialist democracy , labour is a partner in the common task of development Section 18 of Industrial Disputes Act, 1947 was amended in 1956when a clause was added, making settlement by mutual agreement between employer and workmen otherwise than in the course of conciliation proceedings binding upon the parties.

Then Labour Minister, Gulzarilal Nanda, introduced a voluntary code in India called the Code of Discipline in Industry. * Approved in 1958 by the Indian Labour Conference * It affirmed the principle to settle all future differences, disputes and grievances by mutual negotiation, conciliation, and voluntary arbitration. * The Code helped to facilitate the process of collective bargaining by placing a moral obligation on employers to recognize trade unions as bargaining agents. * Between 1961 and 1967 recognition was secured for 48 trade unions in the centre and for 268 unions in the states. The Inter-Union Code of Conduct was also agreed upon during the same period under which the four central labour organizations agreed that Every employee should be free to join the union of his choice and no coercion should be exercised in the matter; There should be no dual membership of unions; And the ignorance and backwardness of workers should not be exploited by any organization. 1970 onwards: * Some new trends started taking place in the field of collective bargaining in the country. * Movement of collective bargaining from the plant or enterprise level to industry level in the country. With the constitution of Joint Bipartite Committee For The Coal Industry (JBCCI)for the coal industry at the national level, collective bargaining became centralized. * A bipartite, National Apex Body was set up in 1975 by the Government to address the general problems of industrial relations in the private sector. On the recommendations of national apex body ,National Industries Committees were set up. PROBLEM ADDRESSED: Collective bargaining allows both workers and managers to discuss specific terms that can, depending on national law: * Determine the rules that govern their relationship. Determine wages. * Deal with other matters of mutual intersest such as hiring practices, layoffs, promotions, job functions, working conditions & hours, work safety, worker discipline, termination and benefit programme. Steps in implementation: 1. Preparing for negotiations through collective bargaining. 2. Establishing bargaining teams composed of four to six representatives on each side of the negotiating table. 3. Members of the bargaining teams must consult thoroughly with all groups that they represent prior to coming to the negotiating table. 4. Conducting negotiations through collective bargaining. 5.

Communicate the outcome of collective bargaining. 1. Preparing for negotiations through collective bargaining involves assembling and consulting extensive data such as: (i) Internal company data related to issues to be discussed (e. g. benefits, leave, work hours and overtime, grievance procedures, discipline, dismissals etc. ) (ii) Labour practices employed by other companies or factories in the same industry or region. (iii) Relevant national legislation related to the issues to be discussed. 2. Establishing bargaining teams composed of four to six representatives on each side of the negotiating table, including appointed hief negotiators for management and for workers. (i) Try to have all types/levels of workers/management represented as that that there will be good representation at all levels and types of jobs. (ii) The chief negotiators should not be the highest-level of staff team, as lower level management/supervisors and regular rank-and-file workers will have the most credibility to represent the interest of the groups they represent. 3. Members of the bargaining teams must consult thoroughly with all groups that they represent prior to coming to the negotiation table.

This consultation process is key to building trust and buy-in to the collective bargaining process. It involves: (i) Explaining the steps of the negotiation process. (ii) Learning the major issues. (iii) Asking questions to understand and note what are the main concerns, interests and expectations regarding these issues. 4. Conducting negotiations through collective bargaining: (i) Open the negotiations with a first meeting devoted to establishing the bargaining authority of the representatives of each side and to determine the rules and procedures to be used during negotiations.

Bargaining rights must be clearly defined for both management and for workers. (ii) List and priorities issue for discussion & set up a meeting schedule. (iii) Submit, analyze and resolve proposals put forward by each side . (iv) In order to reach an agreement proposals must be resolved. They may be withdrawn, accepted by the other side in its entirety, or accepted in some compromise form. However all decisions must be made by consensus of both sides. 5. Communicate the outcome of collective bargaining. (i) Collective bargaining agreements must be put in writing in language that is acceptable to all parties. ii) Copies of the agreement should be distributed to all supervisors, managers & workers & explained at a meeting(or series of meetings). Resources required: For effective collective bargaining to take place, regular and timely meetings must be held between the bargaining teams. Sufficient time and human resources must also be allocated to the consultation process and assembling data in preparation for collective bargaining negotiations. Advantages: * First, collective bargaining has the advantage of settlement through dialogue and consensus rather than through conflict and confrontation.

It differs from arbitration where the solution is based on a decision of a third party, while arrangements resulting from collective bargaining usually represent the choice or compromise of the parties themselves. Arbitration may displease one party because it usually involves a win/lose situation, and sometimes it may even displease both parties. * Second, collective bargaining agreements often institutionalize settlement through dialogue. For instance, a collective agreement may provide for methods by which disputes between the parties will be settled.

In that event the parties know beforehand that if they are in disagreement there is an agreed method by which such disagreement may be resolved. * Third, collective bargaining is a form of participation. Both parties participate in deciding what proportion of the ‘cake’ is to be shared by the parties entitled to a share. It is a form of participation also because it involves a sharing of rule-making power between employers and unions in areas which in earlier times were regarded as management prerogatives, e. g. transfer, promotion, redundancy, discipline, modernisation, production norms.

However, in some countries such as Singapore and Malaysia, transfers, promotions, retrenchments, lay-offs and work assignments are excluded by law from the scope of collective bargaining. * Fourth, collective bargaining agreements sometimes renounce or limit the settlement of disputes through trade union action. Such agreements have the effect of guaranteeing industrial peace for the duration of the agreements, either generally or more usually on matters covered by the agreement. * Fifth, collective bargaining is an essential feature in the concept of social partnership towards which labour relations should strive.

Social partnership in this context may be described as a partnership between organised employer institutions and organised labour institutions designed to maintain non-confrontational processes in the settlement of disputes which may arise between employers and employees. * Sixth, collective bargaining has valuable by-products relevant to the relationship between the two parties. For instance, a long course of successful and bona fide dealings leads to the generation of trust. It contributes towards mutual understanding by establishing a continuing relationship.

The process, once the relationship of trust and understanding has been established, creates an attitude of attacking problems together rather than each other. * Seventh, in societies where there is a multiplicity of unions and shifting union loyalties, collective bargaining and consequent agreements tend to stabilise union membership. For instance, where there is a collective agreement employees are less likely to change union affiliations frequently. This is of value also to employers who are faced with constant changes in union membership and consequent inter-union rivalries resulting n more disputes in the workplace than otherwise. * Eighth – perhaps most important of all – collective bargaining usually has the effect of improving industrial relations. This improvement can be at different levels. The continuing dialogue tends to improve relations at the workplace level between workers and the union on the one hand and the employer on the other. It also establishes a productive relationship between the union and the employers’ organization where the latter is involved in the negotiation process. Positive impact:

Collective bargaining allows workers and managers to discuss issues and settle disputes through consensus and dialogue rather than through confrontation or labour disputes. Both parties know that there is an agreed method for handling disagreements. In addition, collective bargaining allows both employers and workers, or their representatives, to participate in the decision-making process on a variety of topics such as benefits, leave, work hours and overtime as well as grievance procedures, discipline and dismissals. Benefits to management: Workers have a voice and an outlet in the collective bargaining process that reduces uncertainty and instability in the workplace. * Workers are often more motivated following collective bargaining as they have participated in the process and the outcome. * Collective bargaining aids in labour market flexibility by helping workers to understand and accept the need for modernization and restructuring. Benefits to workers: * Collective bargaining provides workers with a collective voice which may be more effective than dealing with managers one by one. Collective bargaining helps ensure adequate wages and working conditions and helps workers to receive a fair distribution of gains that might result from the introduction of new technology. Collective bargaining is also a vehicle for workplace cooperation in that it can ensure, by mutual agreement, that participative practices are integrated into the day-to-day operations of the enterprise. Pros * Can lead to high-performance workplace where labor and management jointly engage in problem solving, addressing issues on an equal standing. * Provides legally based bilateral relationship. * Management’s rights are clearly spelled out. Employers’ and employees’ rights protected by binding collective bargaining agreement. * Multi-year contracts may provide budgetary predictability on salary and other compensation issues. * Unions may become strong allies in protecting higher education from the effects of an economic slowdown. * Promotes fairness and consistency in employment policies and personnel decisions within and across institutions. * Employees may choose whether they want union representation. * A strong labor management partnership may enable the workforce development needed for engaging the technology revolution.

Cons * Management’s authority and freedom are much more restricted by negotiated rules. * Creates significant potential for polarization between employees and managers. * Disproportionate effect of relatively few active employees on the many in the bargaining unit. This is particularly the case when collective bargaining involves a system-wide structure of elections. * Increases bureaucratization and requires longer time needed for decision making. * Increases participation by external entities (e. g. , arbitrators, State Labor Relations Board) in higher education’s decision making. Protects the status quo, thereby inhibiting innovation and change. This is particularly the case when the change involves privatizations. * More difficult for employees at smaller campuses to have their voices heard. * Higher management costs associated with negotiating and administering the agreements. * Eliminates ability of management to make unilateral changes in wages, hours, and other terms and conditions of employment. * Restricts management’s ability to deal directly with individual employees. * Increased dependence on the private sector for certain services, particularly those requiring technological competence, may be compromised. Contract administration is a very difficult process to manage and significantly changes the skill set required of managers and supervisors. Collective bargaining in India: Collective Bargaining is a process involving discussions and negotiations between two groups representing Labour and Management regarding terms of employment. Collective Bargaining, a collective and continuous process, involves formation of bargaining agreements and the implementations of such an agreement. It is a flexible approach that attempts in achieving peace and discipline in the Industry.

The principle of ‘give and take’ has been infused in the principle of Collective Bargaining. As the workers mainly in the formal sector are organized, collective bargaining is more commonly in vogue in the formal sector. In India the workers working in the formal sector, who constitute only seven percent of the total workforce are generally, in a position to gain from the collective bargaining mechanism and the vast majority of the workers engaged in the informal sector are largely untouched by this instrument in its standard form for improvement of their terms of employment.

Generally, all enterprises which are either registered under the purview of any one of the acts like the Indian Factories Act, 1948, Mines and Minerals (Regulations and Development) Act, 1957, Plantation Labour Act, 1951 the Companies Act, 1956 the Central/ State Sales Tax Act, Shops and Establishments Acts of the State Governments are defined as part of the organized sector. Also included are all government companies, Departmental Enterprises and Public Sector Corporations. Also, all workers in the agricultural sectors except those working in the plantations are regarded as informal sector workers.

The Directorate General of Employment and Training (DGET), Ministry of Labour ; Employments considers all organisations in the Public Sector irrespective of their size and non-agricultural establishments in the Private Sector employing ten workers or more as organized sector. In India, Collective Bargaining and rise in Trade Unionism came into existence mainly in the early 20th century. The movement got impetus from Constitutional, statutory and voluntary provisions. Article 19(c) of the Indian Constitution guarantees freedom of association as a fundamental right.

The Trade Unions Act passed in 1926 provides for registration of Trade Unions of employers and workers and in certain respects, it defines the law relating to registered Trade Unions. It confers legal and corporate status on registered Trade Unions. The Amendment to the Trade Unions (Amendments) Act, 1926 in 2001, enforced with effect from 9. 1. 2002 provides for reducing multiplicity of Trade Unions, orderly growth of Trade Unions and promoting internal democracy. India has not ratified ILO Conventions No. 7 (Freedom of Association and protection of the Right to organize) and No. 98 (Right to organize and collective bargaining) due to “technical difficulties”. In India, in the formal sector some important forms of collective bargaining agreements concluded at various levels – Plant, Industry, Sectoral, Regional and National level are – Sectoral Collective Bargaining At National Level Since the early 1970s, sectoral bargaining has been occurring at national level mainly in industries where the Government is a dominant player.

These include banks and coal (employing approximately 8 lakh workers each), Steel and ports and docks (employing two and half lakh each). Industry-Cum-Regionwide Agreements Agreements of this nature are found in Cotton, Jute, Textiles, Engineering and Tea which are dominated by the Indian Private Sector. But such agreements are not binding on enterprise management in the respective industries/regions unless they authorize the respective employer associations in writing to bargain on their behalf.

Decentralised Agreements; Enterprise Or Plant Level In the rest of the industries, whereas the employers press for decentralized negotiations at plant level, the unions insist on bargaining at least at company level where the employees are formed into federations combining several plants/locations. However, in some cases the employers in multi-unit private sector enterprises bargain with trade union federations at company. Trends in collective bargaining:

In recent years, in India as in almost elsewhere, collective bargaining has faced the challenges stemming from falling trade union membership, increasing individualization of labour relations and the difficult quest for greater competitiveness and flexibility in a situation of economic globalization. In this context, certain trends in India could be enumerated as follows. (i) Coverage of collective bargaining is high in the formal sector and very low portion of workers in the informal sector are covered by collective agreements. (ii) Bargaining at the enterprise level is increasing iii) Other forms of bargaining and new issues a) Bargaining in the public sector largely staying at the same level. b) Other forms of bargaining like individual employer-employee bargaining, work councils, bargaining on individual work contracts, bargaining directly with workers’ representatives, work place consultations based on performance targets etc. are on the increase. c) The new issues in the bargaining are bankruptcy, equality, career-developments, leisure time, evaluation systems etc. and overall the issues covered in collective bargaining are broadening.

COLLECTIVE BARGAINING IN THE INFORMAL SECTOR In India, about 93% of the workers are engaged in the informal sector. There have been numerous efforts to bring to the workers in the unorganized sector the benefits those are enjoyed by the more organized workers of the formal sector. It seems clear that instead of merely approximating established forms of collective bargaining originally created for permanent employees, new forms need to be developed which can be applied even to workers who have not been able to be represented in the more established collective bargaining systems.

The key elements of an effective collective bargaining system for the informal sector may be identified as follows. (i) Identifying the appropriate negotiating partner (ii) Recognition/accreditation of representative workers’ organizations in the informal sector. (iii) Independence/autonomy of representative organizations participating in collective bargaining on behalf of the workers in the informal sector. (iv) Democratic Collective bargaining procedures (v) Agreed organizational rights and responsibilities through workers’ education and awareness building. vi) A shift in the nature of negotiated agreements and their status from that of a casual and ad-hoc one that of greater commitment. (vii) Making provisions and developing mechanisms to cope with the eventuality of change of legal persona of either the workers or management arising out of the flexibility of informal economy and the instability of organizations of the employers and workers and ensure continuity. (viii) Development of Innovative Strategies as regards the last resort for workers in lieu of strike such as legal action or public demonstration with a well-worked out media strategy for maximum publicity as a way of ressurizing the other party in the negotiations. There are as yet very few tried and tested collective bargaining mechanisms in place in the informal economy. In India, in addition to the bipartite collective bargaining mechanism at various levels, there are decentralized Tripartite Boards in certain states regulating welfare and social security for certain types of informal work. Challenges and pitfalls: Bargaining deadlocks can occur when there is no movement in negotiations between employers and workers because of a lack of compromise by either party.

A general precondition to effective collective bargaining is that parties negotiate “in good faith”, meaning that they should come to the negotiating table willing to give and take and ultimately reach an agreement. Often, though, each side feels compelled to “push” the other side in order to get what they want. While collective bargaining has historically been confrontational in some countries and contexts, a major challenge is to try and achieve win-win negotiations. Indicators for monitoring: It is important to ensure that secured collective bargaining agreements are put into practice.

It is equally important to provide for the settlement of disputes arising from non-compliance of collective bargaining agreements. History of NCWA(National Coal Wage Agreement) The wage structure and other conditions of service including fringe benefits of the employees in the coal industry are covered under the recommendations of the Central Wage Board for Coal Mining Industry as accepted by the Government of India and made applicable with effect from 15th August, 1967. The workmen in the coal industry demanded a review of the wage structure commensurate with the increase in other industries.

The Government of India considered the matter ; approved the setting up of a Joint Bi-Partite Wage Negotiating Committee for the Coal Industry in the Country consisting of the representatives of the four Central Trade Union Organisation namely, INTUC, AITUC, HMS, CITU ; equal number of representatives of the managements of the five coal producing companies namely, Coal Mines Authority Ltd. ( Including N. C. D. C. ), Bharat Coking Coal Ltd. , Singareni Collieries Co. Ltd. , Indian Iron ; Steel Co. Ltd. , And Tata Iron ; Steel Co. Ltd.

National Coal Wage Agreements were operative as under:- NCWA| PERIOD| SIGNED ON | TENURE| NCWA-I | 01. 01. 1975 to 31. 12. 1978 | 11. 12. 1974 | 4 Yrs. | NCWA-II | 01. 01. 1979 to 31. 12. 1982 | 11. 08. 1979 | 4 Yrs. | NCWA-III | 01. 01. 1983 to 31. 12. 1986 | 11. 11. 1983 | 4 Yrs. | NCWA-IV | 01. 01. 1987 to 30. 06. 1991 | 27. 07. 1989 | 4 ? Yrs| NCWA-V | 01. 07. 1991 to 30. 06. 1996 | 19. 01. 1996 | 5 Yrs. | NCWA-VI | 01. 07. 1996 to 30. 06. 2001 | 23. 12. 2000 | 5 Yrs. | NCWA-VII | 01. 07. 2001 to 30. 06. 006 | 15. 07. 2005 | 5 Yrs. | As the operation of the National Coal Wage Agreement-VII was upto 30th June, 2006, Joint Bipartite Committee for the Coal Industry (JBCCI-VIII) was reconstituted on 18th/21st May, 2007 The composition of the reconstituted JBCCI to negotiate and arrive at NCWA-VIII consisted of representatives of Management ; Central TUs as indicated below : Representing Management No. of members 1. Coal India Limited and its Subsidiary Companies 12 2. Singareni Collieries Co. Ltd. 01 3.

Tata Iron ; Steel Co. Ltd. 01 4. Integrated Coal Mining Ltd. (ICML) 01 5. Bengal EMTA Coal Mining Pvt. Ltd. (BECML) 01 6. Jindal Steel ; Power Ltd. (JSPL) 01 7. Any other Private Coal Companies (If any) 01 Total 18 Representing workmen No. of members 1. Indian National Mine Workers Federation (INTUC) 06 2. Indian Mine Workers Federation ( AITUC) 03 3.

Hind Khadan Mazdoor Federation ( HMS ) 03 4. Akhil Bharatiya Khadan Mazdoor Sangh (BMS) 03 5. All India Coal Workers Federation (CITU) 03 Total 18 | NCWA-VIII| NCWA-VII| 1. PERIOD| 1. 7. 2006 TO 30. 6. 2011| 1. 7. 2001 TO 30. 6. 2006| 2. TENURE| 5 Years| 5 Years| 3. MINIMUM WAGE| RS. 9346. 03 Per month or RS. 359. 46 Per day| RS. 6204. 2 Per month or Rs. 238. 63 Per day| 4. SDA(SPECIAL DEARNESS ALLOWANCE)| 17. 95% Of attendance bonus OR 1. 795% Of basic wage| Do| 5. ATTENDANCE BONUS| Paid quarterly @10% Of basic wage| Do| 6. VARIABLE DA| Variable Dearness Allowance (VDA) linked to the All India Consumer Price Index Number for Industrial workers (Base 1960 = 100 ) (hereinafter called Index Number) adjustable quarterly depending on variation in Consumer Price Index number above 2716. Do| 7. Minimum Guaranteed Benefit| Rs. 1808. 79/- per monthOrRs. 69. 57/- per day| Rs. 1185. 39/- per monthOrRs. 45. 59/- per day| 8. DATE OF INCREMENT| 1ST OF MARCH AND 1ST OF SEPTEMBER EACH YEAR| DO| 9. SPECIAL PIECE RATE ALLOWANCE| Gr. I Rs. 8. 10II Rs. 8. 27III Rs. 8. 46IV Rs. 8. 52V Rs. 10. 57VI Rs. 10. 63 | Gr. I Rs. 5. 37 II Rs. 5. 48 III Rs. 5. 2 IV Rs. 5. 65 V Rs. 7. 02 VA Rs. 7. 05| 10. UNDERGROUND ALLOWANCE| @ 12. 5% of the revised basic wage per monthIn case of Assam (North East Coalfields) @ 15% of revised basic wages per month | @ 10% of revisedPay upto 9000/-p. m ; forAssam 12. 5% of revised basicwage of Rs. 9001/- ; above uniformly. | 11. WASHING ALLOWANCE| Rs75/- per head per month with effect from 01-01-2009. In respect of Nursing Staff, Rs. 90/- per head per month with effect from 01-01-2009. | . @ Rs. 50/- p. m. to those who are provided with uniform and @ Rs. 0/- p. m. to Nursing staff. | 12. TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| @Rs. 10. 50 per day of actual attendance for Employees who do not utilise Company’s transport either free or on payment of nominal or subsidized rate. | Rs. 7/- per day Of actual bonus | 13. ADDITIONAL TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| @ Rs. 15/- per day of work to those in the last shift in night from 10. 00pm. | Rs. 10/- per day of work| 14. CONVEYANCE REIMBURSEMENT| Scooter/moped/motor cycle paid @Rs. 22. 50 per day of attendance w. e. f. 01-01-2009. | Rs. 15/- per day| 15. NURSING ALLOWANCE| Rs. 200/- per month as Nursing Allowance w. . f. 1. 1. 2009| Nil| 16. FUEL ALLOWANCE| Cost of one LPG cylinder 14 kg @ govt rate per month should be provided to employees| Nil| 17. DUST | Dust Mask”. Efforts will be made for effective dust suppression at working place so that workmen are not exposed to heavy dusty conditions| Do| 18. FIXED DEARNESS ALLOWANCE| NIL| NIL| 19. THIN SEAM ALLOWANCE| (i) Seams above 1. 5m thickness – Nil(ii) Seams of 1 meter to 1. meters thickness(a) An amount equal to 5% of revised basic for basket loading and 2. 5% of revised basic for shoveling on to conveyor. (b) An amount equal to 2% of revised basic for time rated, monthly rated and other piece-rated workers required to work at a place where height is between 1 to 1. 5 m | DO| 20. WORKING IN HEAVY WATERY CONDITION-UNDERGROUND| Rain coats, Gum boots and hoods shall be provided need based to such of the workmen who are exposed to heavy watery conditions in underground mines| DO| 21.

TRAVELLING OVER STEEP GRADIENTS| Where travelling over steep gradients exceeds 1000 meters and the average gradient is in excess of 1 in 3, an allowance of Rs. 4. 35 per shift will be paid to each of the workers,working in such a mine or district or section with effect from 01-01-2009. Where suchtraveling exceeds 2000 meters, this allowance will be Rs. 8. 70 per attendance with effect from 01-01-2009 | When TOSG exceeds 1000 meters and the avg. gradients is in excess of 1 in 3,an allow of Rs. 2. 90 per shift will be paid when TOSG exceeds 2000 metres,this will be Rs. 5. 0 per attendance. | 22. ACCUMULATION OF EARNED LEAVE/ANNUAL LEAVE WITH WGES| The existing provisions relating to the accumulation of Earned Leave/Annual Leave will be 140 days prospectively| 120 days| 23. ENCASHMENT OF EARNED LEAVE| @15 days per year On discontinuation of service due to death, retirement, superannuation, VRS etc. the balance leave or 120 days whichever is less will be allowed for encashment| The workmen will be entitled to get encashment of earned leave at the rate of 15 days per year. On discontinuation of service due to death, retirement, superannuation, VRS etc. hebalance leave or 140 days whichever is less will be allowed for encashment| 24. SICK LEAVE ; SPECIAL LEAVE| * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue. Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 110 days . * Grant of Special Leave to employees suffering from Heart disease, TB, Cancer, Leprosy,Paralysis, Renal diseases, H. I. V. and Brain disorder. Shall be granted leave upto 6 months and Paid 50 % of the basic pay at the recommendation of co. medical officer. | * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue.

Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 100 days* DO| 25. NATIONAL/FESTIVAL HOLIDAYS| 8 national festival holidays| Do| 26. CASUAL LEAVE WITH PAY| 7 days of casual leave per annum| Do| 27. RRF/LTC(RETURN RAIL FAIR ; LEAVE LEAVE BENEFIT)| Employees are entitled to LTC ; LLTC once in a block of 4 years. LTC availed for 4 tickets maximum ; upto a distance of 750 km. Employees who have not opted for LTC are eligible to receive RPF for outgoing ; return journey to their hometown for self only. Do| 28. LLTC| Distance of 1700 km each way in respect of block of 4yrs long leave travel concession will continue. Maximum 4 adults ticketsWhen both husband and wife are in same coal company ,they subject to maximum of 6 adult tickets or actual no. of family members concerned. | DO| 29. CLASS OF ENTITLEMENT| First class(Non-AC) fare will be Rs. 8736/-( basic pay) per month in respect of RRF ; Rs. 8812/- (basic pay) per month in respect of LTC/ LLTC. First class(Non-AC) fare will be Rs. 5800/-( basic pay) per month in respect of RRF ; Rs. 5850/- (basic pay) per month in respect of LTC/ LLTC. | 30. HOUSE RENT ALLOWANCE| Rs. 150 per month | Rs. 100 per month| 31. LIFE COVER SCHEME| The existing Life Cover Scheme will continue except that the amount to be paid in additionto the normal gratuity shall be Rs. 60,000/- w. e. f. 1. 1. 2009 | The existing Life Cover Scheme will continue except that the amount to be paid in addition to the normal gratuity shall be Rs. 40000| 32.

PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT | *Employment provided to one dependent of worker, who is permanently disabled and also those who die while in service, dependent means wife or husband or unmarried daughter, son ,legally adopted son, if no such dependent is available then brother, widowed daughter/widowed daughter-in -law or son-in-law residing with deseased. *Dependent should physically fit ; aged not more than 35 years, in case of female spouse it should not more than 45 years. *Employee will be elegible for this benefit(under condition of permanently disabled case) if he/ she is upto the age of 58 years. female dependent have option to chose either employment or monetory compensation of Rs. 6000/- per month. *In case the female dependent is above 45 years of age she will be entitled to only monetory compensation ; not employment. *Monetory compensation will be paid till the female dependent attains the age of 60 years. *If male dependent of the concerned worker is of 12 years and above in age, he will be kept on live roster basis ; would be provided employment with his skills ; qualification , when he attains the age of 18 years. *employment shall be on basic wage of CAT-I as trainee for 6 months. *Employment provided to one dependent of worker, who is permanently disabled and also those who die while in service, dependent means wife or husband or unmarried daughter, son ,legally adopted son, if no such dependent is available then brother, widowed daughter/widowed daughter-in -law or son-in-law residing with deseased. *Dependent should physically fit ; aged not more than 35 years, in case of female spouse it should not more than 45 years. *Employee will be elegible for this benefit(under condition of permanently disabled case) if he/ she is upto the age of 58 years. female dependent have option to chose either employment or monetory compensation of Rs. 4000/- per month in case of death due to mine accident ; in other cases it will be Rs. 3000/- per month. *In case the female dependent is above 45 years of age she will be entitled to only monetory compensation ; not employment. *Monetory compensation will be paid till the female dependent attains the age of 60 years. *If male dependent of the concerned worker is of 12 years and above in age, he will be kept on live roster basis ; would be provided employment with his skills ; qualification , when he attains the age of 18 years. employment shall be on basic wage of CAT-I as trainee for 6 months. | | 33. Revised Basic wage rates for Piece rated workers| Group Rate(Rs. ) Fall Back Wages (Rs. )I 323. 32 321. 54II 330. 25 326. 07III 338. 85 331. 66IV 340. 52 340. 52V 352. 47 352. 47VA 354. 19 354. 19PR Trammers 352. 47 352. 47| Group Rate(Rs. ) Fall Back Wages (Rs. ) I 214. 5 213. 46 II 219. 26 216. 48III 224. 97 220. 20 IV 226. 08 226. 08 V 234. 01 234. 01 VA 235. 15 235. 15PR Trammers 234. 01 234. 01 | | A. DAILY RATED WORKERSCategoryI II IIIIVVVIB. EXCAVATIONSpl. B C D E C. MONTHLY RATEDGradeA1 AB C D E F G H D. CLERICAL GRADE Spl. I II III | Rs. 321. 4 Rs. 328. 78 Rs. 338. 80 Rs. 345. 67 Rs. 360. 03 Rs. 375. 77 Rs. 442. 99 Rs. 397. 06 Rs. 380. 20 Rs. 366. 93 Rs. 342. 99 Rs. 15199. 08 Rs. 11784. 52 Rs. 10935. 02 Rs. 10127. 70 Rs. 9367. 07 Rs. 979. 97 Rs. 8880. 56 Rs. 8757. 06 Rs. 8571. 79 Rs. 10935. 02 Rs. 10127. 70 Rs. 9367. 07 Rs. 8979. 97 | Rs. 213. 46 – 5. 34 – 309. 58 Rs. 218. 28 – 5. 46 – 316. 56. Rs. 224. 94 – 5. 62 – 326. 10 Rs. 229. 50 – 5. 74 – 332. 82 Rs. 239. 03 – 5. 98 – 346. 67 Rs. 249. 48 – 7. 48 – 384. 12 Rs. 294. 11 – 8. 82 – 452. 87 Rs. 263. 62 – 7. 91 – 406. 00 Rs. 252. 42 – 7. 7 – 388. 68 Rs. 243. 61 – 6. 09 – 353. 23 Rs. 227. 72 – 5. 69 – 330. 14 Rs. 10091 – 303 – 13727 Rs. 7824 – 235 – 12054 Rs. 7260 – 218 – 11184 Rs. 6724 – 202 – 10360 Rs. 6219 – 155 – 9009 Rs. 5962 – 149 – 8644 Rs. 5896 – 147 – 8542 Rs. 5814 – 145 – 8424 Rs. 5691 – 142 – 8247 Rs. 7260 – 218 – 11184 – Rs. 6724 – 202 – 10360 – Rs. 6219 – 155 – 9009 – Rs. 5962 – 149 – 8644 | | NCWA-VI| NCWA-V| 1.

PERIOD| 1-07-1996to 30-06-2001| 1-07-1991-30-06-1996| 2. TENURE| 5 years| 5 Years| 3. MINIMUM WAGE| Rs. 3689. 23 per month Or Rs. 141. 89 per day| Rs. 2138. 70 per month Or Rs. 82. 27 per day| 4. SDA(SPECIAL DEARNESS ALLOWANCE)| 17. 95% Of attendance bonus OR 1. 795% Of basic wage| Do | 5. ATTENDANCE BONUS| Paid quarterly @10% Of basic wage| Do| 6.

VARIABLE DA| Variable Dearness Allowance (VDA) linked to the All India Consumer Price Index Number for Industrial workers (Base 1960 = 100 ) | Do| 7. Minimum Guaranteed benefit| Rs. 414. 53/- per month Or Rs. 15. 95/- per day| Rs. 235/- per month Or Rs. 9. 04/- per day| 8. DATE OF INCREMENT| 1ST OF MARCH AND 1ST OF SEPTEMBER EACH YEAR| Do| 9. Special Piece Rate Allowance| GrI Rs. 1. 92II Rs. 2. 4III Rs. 2. 60IV Rs. 2. 60V Rs. 3. 14VA Rs. 3. 14| GrI RS. 1. 08II RS. 1. 26III Rs. 1. 67IV Rs. 1. 67V Rs. 2. 12VA Rs. 2. 12| 10. UNDERGROUND ALLOWANCE| @20% of revised basic pay minus Rs. 1800 per month on pro-rata [email protected]% of revised basic pay minus Rs. 1800 or Rs. 69. 23 per day on pro-rata basis. | @20% of revised basic pay minus Rs. 600 per month on pro-rata basis. | 11. WASHING ALLOWANCE| @ Rs. 40/- p. m. o those who are provided with uniform and @ Rs. 50/- p. m. to Nursing staff. | @ Rs. 15/- p. m. to those who are provided with uniform and @ Rs. 20/- p. m. to Nursing staff. | 12. TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| @ Rs. 5 per day of actual attendance. | @ Rs. 3. 50 per day of actual attendance. | 13. ADDITIONAL TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| @Rs. 7 per day of actual attendance. | @Rs. 5. 50 per day of actual attendance. | 14. CONVEYANCE REIMBURSEMENT| @Rs. 12 per day of actual attendance. | @Rs. 8 per day of actual attendance. | 15. NURSING ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 16.

FUEL ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 17. DUST | “Dust Mask”. Efforts will be made for effective dust suppression at working place so that workmen are not exposed to heavy dusty conditions| Do| 18. FIXED DEARNESS ALLOWANCE| Nil| Rs. 238. 18 per monthOrRs. 9. 16 per day| 19. THIN SEAM ALLOWANCE| i) Seams above 1. 5m thickness – Nil(ii) Seams of 1 meter to 1. 5 meters thickness(a) An amount equal to 5% of revised basic for basket loading and 2. 5% of revised basic for shoveling on to conveyor. b) An amount equal to 2% of revised basic for time rated, monthly rated and other piece-rated workers required to work at a place where height is between 1 to 1. 5 m | Do| 20. WORKING IN HEAVY WATERY CONDITION-UNDERGROUND| Rain coats, Gum boots and hoods shall be provided need based to such of the workmen who are exposed to heavy watery conditions in underground mines| Do| 21. TRAVELLING OVER STEEP GRADIENTS| When TOSG exceeds 1000 meters and the avg. gradients is in excess of 1 in 3,an allow of Rs. 1. 0 per shift will be paid when TOSG exceeds 2000 metres,this will be Rs. 3. 80 per attendance. | | 22. ACCUMULATION OF EARNED LEAVE/ANNUAL LEAVE WITH WGES| 100 days| 90 days| 23. SICK LEAVE ; SPECIAL LEAVE| * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue. Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 90 days . * Grant of Special Leave to employees suffering from Heart disease, TB, Cancer, Leprosy, Paralysis, Renal diseases, H. I. V. and Brain disorder. Shall be granted leave upto 6 months and Paid 50 % of the basic pay at the recommendation of co. medical officer. | * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue.

Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 75 days . * Do| 24. National / Festival holidays| 8 days| Do| 25. CASUAL LEAVE WITH PAY| 7 Days| Do| 26. RRF/LTC(RETURN RAIL FAIR ; LEAVE LEAVE BENEFIT)| Employees are entitled to LTC ; LLTC once in a block of 4 years. LTC availed for 4 tickets maximum ; upto a distance of 750 km. Employees who have not opted for LTC are eligible to receive RPF for outgoing ; return journey to their hometown for self only. | Do| 27. LLTC| Distance of 1700 km each way in respect of block of 4yrs long leave travel concession will continue.

Maximum 4 adults ticketsWhen both husband and wife are in same coal company, they subject to maximum of 6 adult tickets or actual no. of family members concerned. | Do| 28. CLASS OF ENTITLEMENT| First class(Non-AC) fare will be Rs. 3532/-( basic pay) per month in respect of RRF ; Rs. 3575/- (basic pay) per month in respect of LTC/ LLTC. | | 29. HOUSE RENT ALLOWANCE| Rs. 75 per month| Rs. 60 per month| 30. Life Cover Scheme| * The existing Life Cover Scheme will continue except that the amount to be paid in addition to the normal gratuity shall be Rs. 30000. * Delinked form gratuity. | 31. PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT| *Employment provided to one dependent of worker, who is permanently disabled and also those who die while in service, dependent means wife or husband or unmarried daughter, son ,legally adopted son, if no such dependent is available then brother, widowed daughter/widowed daughter-in -law or son-in-law residing with deseased. *Dependent should physically fit ; aged not more than 35 years, in case of female spouse it should not more than 45 years. *Employee will be elegible for this benefit(under condition of permanently disabled case) if he/ she is upto the age of 58 years. female dependent have option to chose either employment or monetory compensation of Rs. 4000/- per month in case of death due to mine accident ; in other cases it will be Rs. 3000/- per month. *In case the female dependent is above 45 years of age she will be entitled to only monetory compensation ; not employment. *Monetory compensation will be paid till the female dependent attains the age of 60 years. *If male dependent of the concerned worker is of 12 years and above in age, he will be kept on live roster basis ; would be provided employment with his skills ; qualification , when he attains the age of 18 years. Do| 32. Revised Basic wage rates for Piece rated workers| Group Rate(Rs. ) Fall Back Wages (Rs. )I 127. 63 126. 92 II 130. 37 128. 71III 133. 37 130. 93 IV 134. 43 134. 43 V 139. 14 139. 14 VA 139. 42 139. 82 Trammers 139. 14 139. 14| | | NCWA-IV| NCWA-III| 1. PERIOD| 01-01-1987 to 30-06-1991| 01-01-1983 to 31-12-1986| 2. TENURE| 4. 5 Years| 4 Years| 3.

MINIMUM WAGE| Rs. 1304. 50 per month Or Rs. 50. 18 per day| Rs. 781. 90 per month Or Rs. 30. 823 per day| 4. SDA(SPECIAL DEARNESS ALLOWANCE)| 17. 95% Of attendance bonus or 1. 795% Of basic wage| Do | 5. ATTENDANCE BONUS| Paid quarterly @10% Of basic wage| Do| 6. VARIABLE DA| Variable Dearness Allowance (VDA) linked to the All India Consumer Price Index Number for Industrial workers (Base 1960 = 100 ) | Do| 7.

Minimum Guaranteed Benefit| Rs. 85/- per monthOrRs. 3. 27/- per day| Rs. 91+ per month| 8. DATE OF INCREMENT| 1ST OF MARCH AND 1ST OF SEPTEMBER EACH YEAR| Do| 9. Special Piece Rate Allowance| GrI Rs. 0. 70II Rs. 0. 80III Rs. 1. 05IV Rs. 1. 05V Rs. 1. 32VA Rs. 1. 32| GrI Rs. 0. 43II Rs. 0. 48III Rs. 0. 60IV Rs. 0. 60V Rs. 0. 70VA Rs. 0. 70| 10.

UNDERGROUND ALLOWANCE| @ 20% of revised basic pay minus Rs. 200/- per month on pro-rata basis| @17. 5 % of basic pay for first two years of the agreement ; 20% of basic pay for next two years. | 11. WASHING ALLOWANCE| @ Rs. 22. 50 per head per month ; for nursing staff Rs. 30 per head per month | @ Rs. 15 per head per month ; for nursing staff Rs. 20 per head per month| 12. TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| Rs. 2. 30 per day of actual attendance. | Rs. 1. 30 per day of actual attendance. | 13. ADDITIONAL TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| Rs. 3. 50 per day of actual attendance| Rs. 2/-per day of actual attendance. 14. CONVEYANCE REIMBURSEMENT| Nil| Nil| 15. NURSING ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 16. FUEL ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 17. DUST | “Dust Mask”. Efforts will be made for effective dust suppression at working place so that workmen are not exposed to heavy dusty conditions| Do| 18. FIXED DEARNESS ALLOWANCE| Rs. 186. 31 per month Or Rs. 7. 17 per day| Rs. 147. 36 per dayOrRs. 5. 667 per day| 19. THIN SEAM ALLOWANCE| i) Seams above 1. 5m thickness – Nil(ii) Seams of 1 meter to 1. 5 meters thickness(a) An amount equal to 5% of revised basic for basket loading and 2. 5% of revised basic for shoveling on to conveyor. b) An amount equal to 2% of revised basic for time rated, monthly rated and other piece-rated workers required to work at a place where height is between 1 to 1. 5 m (iii) Seams below 1m thickness:Management will not allow to work | Do(iii) Seams below 1m thickness:Amount equal to 8% of basic for basket loading ; 4% of basic for shoveling on to conveyor. | 20. WORKING IN HEAVY WATERY CONDITION-UNDERGROUND| Rain coats, Gum boots and hoods shall be provided need based to such of the workmen who are exposed to heavy watery conditions in underground mines. Do| 21. TRAVELLING OVER STEEP GRADIENTS| When TOSG exceeds 1000 meters and the avg. gradients is in excess of 1 in 3,an allow of Rs. 0. 75 per shift will be paid when TOSG exceeds 2000 metres,this will be Rs. 1. 50 per attendance. | When TOSG exceeds 1000 meters and the avg. gradients is in excess of 1 in 3,an allow of Rs. 0. 50 per shift will be paid when TOSG exceeds 2000 metres,this will be Rs. 1. 00 per attendance. | 22. ACCUMULATION OF EARNED LEAVE/ANNUAL LEAVE WITH WGES| 70 days| 70 days| 23. SICK LEAVE ; SPECIAL LEAVE| * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue.

Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 60 days . * Grant of Special Leave to employees suffering from Heart disease, TB, Cancer, Leprosy, Paralysis, Renal diseases, H. I. V. and Brain disorder. Shall be granted leave upto 6 months and Paid 50 % of the basic pay at the recommendation of co. medical officer. | * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue. Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 45 days . * Do| 24. National/Festival holidays| 8 days| Do| 25. CASUAL LEAVE WITH PAY| 7 days| Do| 26.

RRF/LTC(RETURN RAIL FAIR ; LEAVE LEAVE BENEFIT)| Employees are entitled to LTC ; LLTC once in a block of 4 years. LTC availed for 4 tickets maximum ; upto a distance of 750 km. Employees who have not opted for LTC are eligible to receive RPF for outgoing ; return journey to their hometown for self only. | Do| 27. LLTC| Distance of 1700 km each way in respect of block of 4yrs long leave travel concession will continue. Maximum 4 adults ticketsWhen both husband and wife are in same coal company, they subject to maximum of 6 adult tickets or actual no. of family members concerned. Do| 28. CLASS OF ENTITLEMENT| 1st class railway fare will be Rs. 1120/- per month ; Rs. 1135/- per month in respect of LTC/ LLTC. | Nil| 29. HOUSE RENT ALLOWANCE| Rs. 45/- per month| Rs. 30/- per month| | NCWA-II| NCWA-I| 1. PERIOD| 01-01-1979 to 31-12-1982| 01-01-1975 to 31-12-1978| 2. TENURE| 4 Years| 4 Years| 3. MINIMUM WAGE| Rs. 390 per monthOrRs. 15 per day| Rs. 325 per monthOrRs. 12. 50 per day| 4. SDA(SPECIAL DEARNESS ALLOWANCE)| 17. 95% Of attendance bonus OR 1. 795% Of basic wage| Nil | 5.

ATTENDANCE BONUS| Paid quarterly @10% Of basic wage| Do| 6. VARIABLE DA| Variable Dearness Allowance (VDA) linked to the All India Consumer Price Index Number for Industrial workers (Base 1960 = 100 ) | Do| 7. DATE OF INCREMENT| 1ST OF MARCH AND 1ST OF SEPTEMBER EACH YEAR| Do| 8. Special Piece Rate Allowances| Nil| Nil| 9. UNDERGROUND ALLOWANCE| @ 15% of basic| @10% of basic, subject to ceiling of Rs. 80/- per month per head. | 10. WASHING ALLOWANCE| Less than Rs. 10/- per head per month, the rate will be uniformly increased by Rs. /- per head per month| Nil| 11. TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| Nil| Nil| 12. ADDITIONAL TRANSPORT SUBSIDY| Nil| Nil| 13. CONVEYANCE REIMBURSEMENT| Nil| Nil| 14. NURSING ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 15. FUEL ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 16. DUST | Nil| Nil| 17. FIXED DEARNESS ALLOWANCE| Rs. 68. 20 per monthOrRs. 2. 63 per day| Rs. 39 per monthOrRs. 1. 50 per day| 18. THIN SEAM ALLOWANCE| Nil| Nil| 19. WORKING IN HEAVY WATERY CONDITION-UNDERGROUND| Nil| Nil| 20. TRAVELLING OVER STEEP GRADIENTS| Nil| Nil| 21. ACCUMULATION OF EARNED LEAVE/ANNUAL LEAVE WITH WGES| 70 days| Nil| 22.

SICK LEAVE ; SPECIAL LEAVE| * 15 days with full pay in calendar year will continue. Sick leave with full pay will accumulate upto 45 days . * Grant of Special Leave to employees suffering from Heart disease, TB, Cancer, Leprosy, Paralysis, Renal diseases, H. I. V. and Brain disorder. Shall be granted leave upto 6 months and Paid 50 % of the basic pay at the recommendation of co. medical officer. | Nil| 23. National/Festival holidays| 7 days| Do| 24. CASUAL LEAVE WITH PAY| 7 days| Nil| 25. RRF/LTC(RETURN RAIL FAIR ; LEAVE LEAVE BENEFIT)| Basic wage ; Rs. 10 per month eligible to receive II class railway fare. RRF is available for 3years in a block of 4 years. | Basic wage ; Rs. 380 per month eligible to receive II class railway fare ; others in receipt of basic wage of Rs. 380 per month and above will be eligible to I class. | 26. LLTC| Nil| Nil| 27. HOUSE RENT ALLOWANCE| Rs. 12/- per month| Nil| Analysis: *Fixed Dearness Allowance (FDA) was introduced in NCWA-I at Rs. 39/- per month or Rs. 1. 50/- per day. However FDA was only upto NCWA-V, i. e. in NCWA-VI, VII, VIII, FDA is not present. *Special Dearness Allowance (SDA) was introduced in NCWA-II, which was at the rate of 17. 95% of attendance bonus or 1. 795% of basic wage, which is same upto NCWA-VIII. *When NCWA-I was finalized in Dec. 1974, it was decided that attendance bonus at 10% of the basic wage earned by the employee should form an integral part of the wage structure of the employees covered thereunder without any linkage to the minimum attendance. *Provision of employment to dependants of deceased employee ; permanently disabled worker, was introduced in NCWA-II, here current provision under NCWA-VIII is: (i)Employment provided to one dependent of worker, who is permanently disabled and also those who die while in service, dependent means wife or husband or unmarried daughter, son ,legally adopted son, if no such dependent is available then brother, widowed daughter/widowed daughter-in -law or son-in-law residing with deseased. (ii)Dependent should physically fit ; aged not more than 35 years, in case of female spouse it should not more than 45 years. (iii)Employee will be elegible for this benefit(under condition of permanently disabled case) if he/ she is upto the age of 58 years. iv)female dependent have option to chose either employment or monetory compensation of Rs. 6000/- per month. (iv)In case the female dependent is above 45 years of age she will be entitled to only monetory compensation ; not employment. (v)Monetory compensation will be paid till the female dependent attains the age of 60 years. (vi)If male dependent of the concerned worker is of 12 years and above in age, he will be kept on live roster basis ; would be provided employment with his skills ; qualification , when he attains the age of 18 years. vii)employment shall be on basic wage of CAT-I as trainee for 6 months. *Washing Allowance was introduced in NCWA-II to those employees provided with uniforms by the management which was less than Rs. 10/- per head per month, the rate uniformly increased by Rs. 5/- per head per month. ; now in NCWA-VIII this is Rs. 75/- per head per month. *Medical facilities on recommendations of the Medical Sub-committee of the JBCCI(Sub-committee ‘E’) was implemented from NCWA-II. *Ambulance ; expenditure on medicines was introduced in NCWA-II. *Currently employees get only two types of D. A. , S. D. A. amp; V. D. A. , but before NCWA-VI, they get three types of D. A. S. D. A. , V. D. A. ; F. D. A. , where S. D. A. was not available in NCWA-I, this was introduced in NCWA-II, ; F. D. A. was eliminated after NCWA-V. *Transport subsidy ; Additional transport subsidy was introduced in NCWA-III. *Grant of Special Leave to employee suffering from TB, Cancer, Leprosy, ; Paralysis was introduced from NCWA-II. *In NCWA-III, it was agreed that 1st May will be Miners Day ; be declared as additional paid holiday in the month of May in each Year. This will be in addition to the 7 paid holidays.

So from NCWA-III to NCWA-VIII, National/festival holidays is 8 days per year. *Educational facilities was introduced in NCWA-III, in previous agreement NCWA-II, “ The JBCCI could not go into all aspects of educational facilities to be provided to children of coal mines workers. It was agreed to collect necessary information on this subject” But in NCWA-III, the pattern of educational institutions in the coal industry was as indicated below: (i) primary school – in coal mine/ colliery/ colony (ii) Middle/Jr. High school- in big colliery or group of collieries. (iii) High school/Higher- At area

Secondary school About 100 schools were constructed by coal companies during the period of 4 years from date of signing of NCWA-IV. *Nursing allowance is introduced in NCWA-VIII, Where nursing staff gets Rs. 200/- per month. *Fuel allowance is introduced in NCWA-VIII, where cost of one LPG cylinder(14. 5 KG) at Govt. rate is provided to employees. *Contract labour provision was introduced in NCWA-III, where current provision under NCWA-VIII is as follows: (i) Industry shall not employ labour through Contractor or engage Contractors’ labour on jobs of permanent and perennial nature. ii) Jobs of permanent and perennial nature, which are at present being done departmentally, will continue to be done by regular employees. (iii) Implementation of this clause and the progress made thereon will be reviewed by the JBCCI periodically. (iv) The Management as a Principal employer shall continue to monitor and supervise the implementation of the various provision of labour laws, CMPF/PF including payment of contractor’s workers by contractors at counters specified by the Principal employer. v) Payment to the contractor labour by cheque or through Bank operating in the region. *Average increment in minimum wage is 63. 22%, which is very good from employee point of view. i. e. , company provides high wage to their employees. NCWA| | Minimum wage(Rs. ) Per month| Percentage of increment| NCWA-VIII| 9346. 06| 50. 63%| | NCWA-VII| 6204. 62| 68. 18%| NCWA-VI| 3689. 23| 72. 49%| NCWA-V| 2138. 7| 63. 94%| NCWA-IV| 1304. 5| 66. 83%| NCWA-III| 781. 9| 100. 48%| NCWA-II| 390| 20%| | NCWA-I| 325| | Average Increment= 63. 22%

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